ghs

Greenfield, Massachusetts

October 18, 2020
Copyright, 2020, P. Grisé, Tallahassee , Florida

 

Our home page lists all class members, personal email addresses (with links) and pertinent information. This web site is copyrighted and no content or individual information  may be used without the express permission of the webmaster.

Directions for Using this Website:

There are two listings of class members, one by state  of residence [CLASS - (STATE)], and one that is alphabetical by name [CLASS(A-Z)].  You can access either of those lists or this HOMEpage, by clicking on the appropriate button on the left. Then there is a series of PHOTO ALBUM from our pre-high school days, in high school and the reunions.  HOME STORIES are glimpses into how classmates left Greenfield and settled in other communities. RESOURCES provides topical areas for which classmates are willing to offer expert advice.

Don't forget the Nostalgia page

Old Folks At Home

lunch

A grand collection of classmates dining together in early October. Left to Right: George Roy, Beth Anderson-Roy, Susan Mack McDonald, Deb Bruce Johnson, Bill McDonald, and David Johnson.

The Half Century Anniversaries Just Keep on Coming!

jane wedding... jane and Charlie

Classmate Jane LaPointe married Charlie Kosterman (GHS'64) during a gorgeous October Autumn back in 1970

Hamilton

Mid-September brought a couple more 50th Anniversaries to our class. Here's Billy and Sue Hamilton celebrating.

Simpter

Likewise, mid-September also brought a half-century celebration for Karen (Simpter) Lenarczyk and her husband Frank.

cm

On September 25th Carolyn Machaiek and Bob Morahan were wed 50 years ago!

Much like we've celebrated our class's Golden Anniversary in 2015, it seems we now find ourselves having an amazing number of classmates who have been married for at least 50 years. This collection continues to grow. Here's who we have so far:

Karen Steiner and Chris Helbig (GHS '64) got married February 3, 1968 and have been married 52 1/2 years. The more recent picture of our family is from Maine 2018.

Karen & Chris

Karen Steiner and Chris Helbig

helbig family

Jeff Burgess - The spring/summer of 1969 was very eventful. We both graduated in May from UMass, married on July 12th and I was drafted in late August.
A local American Legion Post had rented the venue (Vincent's Steakhouse in West Springfield, MA) after our reception.  As we were leaving for our honeymoon at Cape Cod, they offered to drive us around the parking lot in a vintage fire engine.  Andrea was afraid I was going to fall off as you can tell by her expression. She didn't want to be a widow on her wedding day.

wedding

Jeff and Andrea Burgess

truck. now

Sharyn Brown- Married in July 1969 to Fred Philcox.

Susan Mack, Deb Bruce, and Pat Chornyak all married classmates during 1969. They were, respectively,Bill MacDonald, David Johnson, and Phil Grise. Here they are together at our Class 40th reunion in 1995.

oldies

Sue and Bill, Deb and Dave, Pat and Phil

deb cards

Deb Bruce married David Johnson in June 1969

Patti Capron - June 1, 1969 married George Rau (GHS '64). George and Patti are taking a Viking Cruise on the Rhone River through southern France, but they did a short junket to Block Island for their actual anniversary.

 

Susan Carey - August 16, 1969 married Wayne Duckworth

sue ..new sue

Sue and Wayne have been celebrating throughout the summer with family and friends and with some special travel.

 

Pat Chornyak - Married Phil Grise September 6, 1969 and moved to Tallahassee, Florida one week later... remaining there ever since.

pp.. pp

Dave Ciszewski - Married 51 years ago on January 27, 1968 to Judith Lopatka (GHS '66).

Beverly Grant Whitbeck - Married in May 1969

Phil Grise - Married Pat Chornyak on September 6, 1969 . We celebrated with scores of our friends at our home, chowing down on catered on-site fried grouper, shrimp and fried oysters, as well as fresh shucked oysters and cheese grits. That was followed by an ice cream truck that served up scoops and rootbeer floats!

food.. lofty

Susan Hutchinson - Married Jeff Webster (TFHS 65) October 25, 1969.

Susan Hutchinson and Jeffrey Webster met at GCC (Sociology 102), introduced by one of Jeff’s TFHS classmates. They were hitched on October 25, 1969, at Robbins Memorial Church. It was a gorgeous blue-sky-crunchy-falling-leaves kind of day. Randy Kinner was Maid of Honor. A special wedding guest was Wendy Vinta, a friend from Honolulu. Sue met Wendy after moving to Hawaii while Jeff was stationed there aboard a U.S. Coast Guard cutter. Beautiful flower leis were presented by Wendy and also sent by Sue’s former employer, Hilton Hawaiian Village. After a short honeymoon on the Cape featuring baked-stuffed shrimp for breakfast and finding gift checks stuffed in their glove box, they returned to their apartment in Winthrop, Mass. Sue went to work at Mass. General Hospital, while Jeff resumed his duties in the Coast Guard. Subsequent moves included: Greenfield; Manchester, CT; Sacramento, CA; and Green Valley, AZ, in the Sonoran Desert. They spent the first 33 years of their lives (minus 16 months in Hawaii) in New England. They spent the next 33 years in California. When they are 99, it will be time for another move. Both Sue and Jeff have spent many of their 50 married years volunteering for hospices and various other causes while spoiling small dogs and cats. Nowadays, they are on a quest to see as many national parks as possible. The current count stands at 27 out of 61 parks. For their golden anniversary, they will be returning to Hawaii to revisit old haunts

suejeff.. jeffsue

David Johnson married Deb Bruce in June 1969 and after many decades of bucolic life in New Caanan, New Hampshire, they returned to Greenfield in July, 2019.

d&D

Bill McDonald married Sue Mack in September1969 and enjoyed an island cruise with the family for their 50th

sue and bill

 

Carolyn Machaiek married Bob Morahan in September 1970

carolyn & bob

Sue Mack married Bill McDonald.

Ellen Morrissey married Mike Kelton on November 25, 1969

ellen

The Kelton's are FAMOUS for their celebrations of St. Paddy's Day. Ellen and Mike brew up unbelievable quantites of corn beef every year. Here's proof.

morrissey

Ellen and Mike are proud grandparents at Avery's high school graduation.

 

Warren Peters married Jeannie Heald (GHS '63) 52.333 years ago. Perhaps the longest married couple!

warren  wedding.. warren

 

Rick Richardson married Diane on June 6, 1968 the day Robert Kennedy was killed!

rick... rick2

No doubt, I'm missed some of the weddings among classmates, but it's never too late to send in photos and info to be added. This set is likely to get it's own chapter on the left side of the website.

 

We Changed?..Well, Some of Us Have

We Changed?..Well, Some of Us Have Mid-September brought a couple more 50th Anniversaries to our class. Here's Billy and Sue Hamilton celebrating. Likewise, mid-September also brought a half-century celebration for Karen (Simpter) Lenarczyk and her husband Frank. On September 25th Carolyn Machaiek and Bob Morahan were wed 50 years ago! Much like we've celebrated our class's Golden Anniversary in 2015, it seems we now find ourselves having an amazing number of classmates who have been married for at least 50 years. This collection continues to grow. Here's who we have so far: Karen Steiner and Chris Helbig (GHS '64) got married February 3, 1968 and have been married 52 1/2 years. The more recent picture of our family is from Maine 2018. Karen Steiner and Chris Helbig Jeff Burgess - The spring/summer of 1969 was very eventful. We both graduated in May from UMass, married on July 12th and I was drafted in late August. A local American Legion Post had rented the venue (Vincent's Steakhouse in West Springfield, MA) after our reception.†As we were leaving for our honeymoon at Cape Cod, they offered to drive us around the parking lot in a vintage fire engine.†Andrea was afraid I was going to fall off as you can tell by her expression. She didn't want to be a widow on her wedding day. Jeff and Andrea Burgess . Sharyn Brown- Married in July 1969 to Fred Philcox. Susan Mack, Deb Bruce, and Pat Chornyak all married classmates during 1969. They were, respectively,Bill MacDonald, David Johnson, and Phil Grise. Here they are together at our Class 40th reunion in 1995. Sue and Bill, Deb and Dave, Pat and Phil Deb Bruce married David Johnson in June 1969 Patti Capron - June 1, 1969 married George Rau (GHS '64). George and Patti are taking a Viking Cruise on the Rhone River through southern France, but they did a short junket to Block Island for their actual anniversary. Susan Carey - August 16, 1969 married Wayne Duckworth .. Sue and Wayne have been celebrating throughout†the summer with family and friends and with some special†travel. Pat Chornyak - Married Phil Grise September 6, 1969 and moved to Tallahassee, Florida one week later... remaining there ever since. .. Dave Ciszewski - Married 51 years ago on January 27, 1968 to Judith Lopatka (GHS '66). Beverly Grant Whitbeck - Married in May 1969 Phil Grise - Married Pat Chornyak on September 6, 1969 . We celebrated with scores of our friends at our home, chowing down on catered on-site fried grouper, shrimp and fried oysters, as well as fresh shucked oysters and cheese grits. That was followed by an ice cream truck that served up scoops and rootbeer floats! .. Susan Hutchinson - Married Jeff Webster (TFHS 65) October 25, 1969. Susan Hutchinson and Jeffrey Webster met at GCC (Sociology 102), introduced by one of Jeffís TFHS classmates. They were hitched on October 25, 1969, at Robbins Memorial Church. It was a gorgeous blue-sky-crunchy-falling-leaves kind of day. Randy Kinner was Maid of Honor. A special wedding guest was Wendy Vinta, a friend from Honolulu. Sue met Wendy after moving to Hawaii while Jeff was stationed there aboard a U.S. Coast Guard cutter. Beautiful flower leis were presented by Wendy and also sent by Sueís former employer, Hilton Hawaiian Village. After a short honeymoon on the Cape featuring baked-stuffed shrimp for breakfast and finding gift checks stuffed in their glove box, they returned to their apartment in Winthrop, Mass. Sue went to work at Mass. General Hospital, while Jeff resumed his duties in the Coast Guard. Subsequent moves included: Greenfield; Manchester, CT; Sacramento, CA; and Green Valley, AZ, in the Sonoran Desert. They spent the first 33 years of their lives (minus 16 months in Hawaii) in New England. They spent the next 33 years in California. When they are 99, it will be time for another move. Both Sue and Jeff have spent many of their 50 married years volunteering for hospices and various other causes while spoiling small dogs and cats. Nowadays, they are on a quest to see as many national parks as possible. The current count stands at 27 out of 61 parks. For their golden anniversary, they will be returning to Hawaii to revisit old haunts .. David Johnson married Deb Bruce in June 1969 and after many decades of bucolic life in New Caanan, New Hampshire, they returned to Greenfield in July, 2019. Bill McDonald married Sue Mack in September1969 and enjoyed an island cruise with the family for their 50th Carolyn Machaiek married Bob Morahan in September 1970 Sue Mack married Bill McDonald. Ellen Morrissey married Mike Kelton on November 25, 1969 The Kelton's are FAMOUS for their celebrations of St. Paddy's Day. Ellen and Mike brew up unbelievable quantites of corn beef every year. Here's proof. Ellen and Mike are proud grandparents at Avery's high school graduation. Warren Peters married Jeannie Heald (GHS '63) 52.333 years ago. Perhaps the longest married couple! .. Rick Richardson married Diane on June 6, 1968 the day Robert Kennedy was killed! ... No doubt, I'm missed some of the weddings among classmates, but it's never too late to send in photos and info to be added. This set is likely to get it's own chapter on the left side of the website.

It's Autumn

lake

Ellen Morrissey Kelton has a family 'camp' in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont - Island Pond. And there, fall foliage is well underway!

fall fall

fall................................. leaf

.................Northern Vermont.....................................................................................................................Eastern Massachusetts

fall

An Arizona Autumn from Susan Hutchinson Webster

 

400 Hundred Years

 

2020 is very likely to go down as the strangest year yet in our lifetimes. COVID19, hurricanes, drought, nearby asteroids and of course a stunning Presidential election looming in the near future. If just a few of these calamaties weren't present, Americans might have a better recollection that 2020 is also the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower delivering the British Pilgrims to Provincetown and then Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts. When we were in elementary school, most of the Fall was taken up with the early history of Western Europeans arriving on the eastern shores to begin America. Today, we know much of that information was incomplete or just plain wrong. At the very least, horribly biased. Putting that aside, eastern Massachusetts had significant galas planned for the late summer celebrations -- but alas COVID19 brought all that to a screeching halt. The Mayflower II was recently refurbished at the shipyard in Mystic, Connecticut and returned to Plymouth just last week. Intrepid classmate Bob Clift, a resident of several southeastern Massachusetts communities, grabbed a photo of the ship in harbor for us.

boat

Mayflower II (build in 1956) ,returned to Plymouth Rock on August 11, Bob Clift photo.

After three and a half years of restoration at Mystic, Mayflower II sails back to Plymouth

Some Philanthropic Information

Bob Morahan husband of classmate Carolyn Machaiek has sent out a call for support. As you may know, Carolyn has been dealing with Alzheimer's for a few years. She is now instutionalized and Bob is seeking support for research efforts to combat Alzheimers. He is doing a walk on September 12 and would love to have classmates donate. If you wish to help, go to this link www.alz.org/walk There, you will find a button that says FIND YOUR WALK, and below it "Find A Walker" . Enter Bob's name and it will bring you to a lin of the Maine Beaches Area with a DONATE button. You know the rest!

Phyllis Stone recently completed her 13th Wheeling for Healing ride in a row (virtually this year). This event supports Baystate Franklin County Hospital's Oncology Unit patients. Through help of contributors, Phyllis raised $1,000.

------- 56th REUNION UPDATE -------

October 14-16, 2021

Dear GHS ’65 Classmates, 

After the sadness we experienced in postponing our 55th GHS Class Reunion, we are now happy to report that our 56th GHS Class of 1965 Reunion has been rescheduled to October 14-16, 2021.  We feel that by then – 17 months from now – we will feel much more comfortable in traveling and getting together, and can share the memories of our Greenfield HS years as well as reconnect with friends and classmates.  Because many other people and organizations are also rescheduling to 2021, the Delaney House ballroom was booked for every Saturday next fall.  Since most of us can be flexible in our schedules, we have scheduled a Thursday - Saturday reunion.

The good news is that we were able to have nearly $1,000 in deposits credited to our new dates, so none of our deposit money has been lost.  For those of you who made 2020 reservations at the D. Hotel Suites & Spa, the hotel that adjoins the Delaney House in Holyoke, you should have received a cancellation notice on May 8th.  To rebook for the new dates for the discounted block of rooms, please call 413-583-2100 and use Code GHS21, or go to https://bit.ly/3dxAfRX to book online.  Again, you must mention GHS21 to receive the discount; there is no cost if you cancel these reservations up to 24 hours prior to your date of arrival at the 2021 Reunion.

One new feature of the Reunion will be a PowerPoint presentation on which Deb Johnson Richter is collaborating with Phil Grise.The presentation is based upon Memories of Greenfield Throughout our School Years will be shown at the Friday Class dinner.  To assemble this presentation, Deb has asked us to share our remembrances on 3”x5” index cards, one idea per card, and mail them to Deborah Richter, P.O. Box 37, 648 Deep Creek Road, Hegins, PA 17938.

Please continue to take every precaution and stay safe through this COVID-19 pandemic.  And a big shout-out of thanks to you or your sons, daughters, grandchildren, family members, and friends who are essential workers in providing medical services, food, police and fire protection, governmental, and the many other services that are keeping us going during these challenging times!

Best wishes to you and your families,

Rob Pratt                          Karen Hardaker Nuckols                             Phyllis Stone

 

 

Newlyweds!

And as a fitting finale to this set of long married folks, let's also celebrate the most recent wedding among our classmates. Many of you know that Ed Hall's wife of many decades, Maria, died last year. But early in 2019, widower Ed happily tied the knot again. His new wife Pam is also the widow of a cancer victim, and they found themselves to be a great match.. You may have also noticed that Ed now lives in Point Pleasant, New Jersey, home of Jersey Mikes!! Best wishes to Ed and Pam for many deades together!

ed

Ed Hall is second from right in a family photo recently taken in Alaska. His bride is iin the center.

Ed Hall and his bride, Pam

More Four Corners Oldies

girls

Front Row: Susan Yetter, Mary Vetterling, Joan Deneault, Beverly Grant; Back Row: Deb Bruce, Susan Mack, Patti Capron, and Betty True

We've got to give it to the classmates who also happen to be alumni of Four Corners Elementary School. They are digging through their attics and finding numerous ancient pictures. Sue Mack McDonald recently shared the party picture below with us via Facebook. The great part is that even the names of such young faces are included. That's usually the hardest part.

 

Four Corners Again

Here's yet another oldie-goldie photo sent in by Beth Anderson Roy. It's a shot of 5th graders at Four Corners School. I'll soon be moving both images over to the section of this website devoted to our early history in images. but for now, here it is.

fc5

From the ever sharp old brain of David "Bozo" Johnson, comes a partial list of Beth Anderson’s 5th grade picture. 

Left to Right, Row 1: Paul Allen, Debbie Bruce, Sheila Sommer, Tom Purple, Joanie Deneault, and Beverly Grant.

Row 2: Mary Vetterling, Beth Anderson, Mnoa Stone, Paula Bennett

Row 3: Patti Capron, Susan Mack, ??, Gwen Glabach, Barbara French, Rob Pratt and ??

Row 4: Jeff Burgess, Marilyn Herskee, Susan Yetter, Barbara Young, Gretchen Alberti, ??, DeeDee Hohengasser, David Johnson

Row 5: Keith Franklin, Billy Jarris, David Bassett, Robert Kulis, Bobby Lane, Henry Juhola, Jim McKenzie <

Mini Reunion

For several years, "Camp Crazy" in New Hampshire has been the site of mini GHS65 reunions for some of the women in our class. These folks (give or take a couple) have gotten together since middle school (more or less) and insist it's a 'No Boys Allowed" event. This is a piece of lakeside property that Deb Bruce Johnson and David Johnson have owned for some time on some lake .

cc1cc2

Here we have old pals Sharyn Brown Philcox, Deb Bruce Johnson, Patti Capron Rau, Sue Mack McDonald and Sue Carey Duckworth

 

GHS Vets Field Gets Big Changes

by Jason Butynski

If you’ve happened to drive past Veterans Memorial Field in Greenfield over the past couple of weeks, you may notice that the baseball field is getting a facelift of sorts.

Thanks to a very generous donation from Greenfield American Legion Post 81, the press box and storage shed are brand new. Anyone who has announced or covered a game at Vets Field knew that the press box was one of the least sturdy around. The ladder to climb up to the box felt just about safe enough that it could crumble as you climbed it, and the inside of the booth was not all that big or comfortable. In fact, I don’t know if I can remember ever covering a game at Vets when a media member sat in the box. It was usually reserved for the public-address man announcing the game, and possibly a platform for which Trevor Kuchieski could sing the National Anthem.

In fact, the young son of Greenfield High School athletic director Mike Kuchieski was one of the few people who probably felt safe climbing to the top of the box. “It seemed like the ladder got a little steeper and the hole got a little smaller over time,” said Legion Baseball chairman Bill Phelps. Phelps, who served 22 months in Vietnam while serving for the United States Special Forces Green Beret, has a long history on the local baseball scene. Phelps graduated from Greenfield in 1965 before going off to war. He returned home after two tours and has been involved with local baseball ever since. He coached the now-defunct Greenfield Community College baseball team, and has been involved with the Legion program for 35 years, since he revived it from the dead.

Phelps is now a big part of the Legion, serving as its financial officer, and the organization had funds to donate after selling off the old Legion building behind the Green Fields Market on Main Street in Greenfield. The old Legion building now serves as a marijuana dispensary. Phelps wanted to use some of the money from the sale for Vets Field upgrade. Originally, he proposed building a stairway, but it was determined that to do it correctly, the entire building needed to be taken down and rebuilt. “I brought it up to the Post,” Phelps recalled. “I said, ‘Let’s do something for Vet’s Field.’”

vets field

Bill Phelps at the new Press Box

The former press box and storage shed was built by current Greenfield High School coach Tom Suchanek roughly 25 years ago, but Phelps recognized that upgrading the press box and shed would seriously alter the look of Veterans Memorial Field and turn it into one of the nicest facilities in the area. The Legion hired Mowry & Schmidt to work on the project, and Bob Provost and Phelps went to work on designing the new facility. The former press box was taken down and Phelps got to keep its ladder as a memento. The shed now has separate 9 by 12-foot storage areas for both the high school and Legion teams. Above the storage shed sits the press box, which is 12 by 18 feet and has a beautiful staircase leading up to it on one side. The box also has a top-of-the-line sound system, so no more staticfilled game announcements.

As for the Legion itself, it still exists despite not having a building to call home. About four years ago, the Legion building which was located on Legion Ave., behind what was the old Woolworths, off Wells St., near Main St. Members hold their monthly meetings in the basement of Smitty’s Pub. Nationally, Phelps says popularity of the Legions has greatly diminished. The passing of WWII vets and frequent differences in points of view betweenViet Nam Vets and WWII Vets has been bringing about the national demise. Greenfield is enduring this cultural shift as are many communities. And even if the Legion eventually dissolves, it will never be forgotten. Just like the field, which was donated to the town of Greenfield by the veterans who returned from World War II, the baseball press box will always be a reminder of the men who served our country by bearing the name of the Legion club that paid for the project.

Remember This??

4 corners

Here's the combined Kindergarten Class from Four Corners School (the old school) at Mayday

Soon this picture will be remaining in perpituity in our PHOTO ALBUM section of the website among early days photos.

Please send a listing of who's who here. This is the GHS Class of 65!! No prizes, sorry.

 

Finding Greenfield in Arizona

Arizona is often looked upon as a great retirement state. A modest number of GHS65ers have once upon a time or currently live there. Decades ago, the late Mike Molitoris was a resident of the state. Harvey Stone moved from New England to AZ, then to South Carolina and now to gorgeous mountains of Tennessee. Sue Murdock Lutz took the retirement leap from Capifornia down to Arizona last year. And a few years back, Susan Hutchinson Webster, relocated and retired from Sacremento, CA to Arizona. I'm sure there are additional Greenfield folks floating around the Grand Canyon State, but currently, just the two Sues are representing GHS65, at the moment.

As a special thrill last week however, there was an additional Greenfielder at the University of Arizona. Penn Gillette was the highlighter for a university event, and Sue Hutchinson Webster got to spend a few moments with him. Penn is a 1973 GHS graduate and was a recipient of Susan's sisters babysitting activities back in the day. Many of us also recall buying and selling coins at the Gillette family business and saw that youngster Penn riding around town on a bike or unicycle. Today of course, he is a Las Vegas resident and headliner... but he does make it back to town from time to time. Dare we say, it was a magical time!!

Sue and Penn

Another Classy Weekend!

We did it. Well over 100 classmates and friends gathered together in Greenfield for a weekend of memories, stretching back many decades as we had a group 70th birthday party. Four events over Friday and Saturday, September 8-9 gave classmates an opportunity to come together in various groupings and visiting with lots of friends. General Chair for the series of events was Rob Pratt, who brought together an extremely able team to make this all happen.

Friday noon began the action with lunch at the Wagon Wheel, with about 20 classmates, including 4 Floridians who were keeping a close eye on what path Hurricane Irma would take, (Beth Anderson Roy from Tampa; Pat Davis Flett from Port St. Lucie; and Phil and Pat Grise from Tallahassee). Luckily, we were all spared significant damage.

Later in the afternoon, Gail Rogers Callahan hosted a silk tye-dyeing event at her home for several classmates, with great results that they displayed (see Photo Album). In the evening, Fran Sirum hit the jackpot for the class with a grand happy hour at the Elks Lodge. That event brought more than 70 classmates and friends together for early evening conversation.

The highlight was of course, the Saturday luncheon at Franklin County Fairgrounds, under the stewardship of Fair President and classmate Pete Steiner. More than 100 gathered together on the infield to dine and visit for a few hours.

You can find all the details, and scores of photos in the PHOTO ALBUM section of this website, located in the menu bar on the left. Click on PHOTO ALBUM, then choose the 70th Birthday bar. OR, QUICKER STILL, JUST CLICK ON THE RIBBON BELOW.

nametag

 

Solutions to the Tatoo Mystery Contest

Do you recall our ongoing contest regarding Who's Tatoo IS This? Well, the answer was on display at the Fairgrounds. Jeff Burgess is the culprit. The ankle tatoos belonged to Marsha Drew Bittner and Ellen Morrissey Kelton.

tatoo

Andrea and Jeff Burgess with Deb Bruce Johnson and Susan Carey Duckworth

Frank Smith - No Couch Potato!

frank smith

Frank Smith earning a Bronze Medal

by Frank Smith - Iíve been following the various adventures of members of the class of 1965 on the website. Iíd like to encourage everyone to stay active and stay healthy.

After I retired from my career with the Veteran's Administration, I started working out on my own. I eventually fell in with a group of Powerlifters at my gym. Powerlifting is a sport that has three events: squat, bench press and deadlift. Itís divided into weight classes (74 to 83 kg) and age (Masters 4a, 70 to 74, in my case). For the last couple of years Iíve been competing in Powerlifting events.

On 04/29/2017, eleven days after I turned 70, I competed in the New Hampshire State Powerlifting Championships. I won bronze medals in the Open and Masterís divisions. I set New Hampshire state records for my age and weight in the squat (82.5 kg Ė181 pounds) and three-lift total (322.5 kg Ė 711 pounds). In addition, I tied the NH state record in the deadlift (137.5 kg-- 303.1 pounds).

Although I did not set the NH record in the bench press, itís actually my best event. My 102.5 kg bench press was the sixth heaviest bench press in the nation (in my age and weight division) since 2013 when they changed the weight classes. My goals for 2018 is get my three-lift total to 800 pounds and compete in Regionals or the National Championships.

Again, Iíd like to encourage everyone to stay active. You never know what you can do until you try!

My YouTube channel [https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0kzoIl-LdM41oYD6EJLqXA ] shows a couple lifts from 2016 and 2017. You can also find Frank broadcasting on ham radio at WS1MH. Photography and videos by my sister Gail Smith, GHS Ď69.

 

SILVER For Buzz Gagne

Toward the end of last year, Buzz Gagne spent two weeks competing and traveling through Australia. He won the Sliver Medal in the Javelin at the Perth 2016 World Masters Athletics Championships in Perth.  Athletics is Track & Field in the USA but not overseas.  While down under, Buzz traveled to Alice Springs in the Outback and took a long day tour of Uluru, formerly Ayers Rock.

buzz

Buzz Gagne receiving the Silver Medalin Perth for Javelin.

buzz2

The three winners in Javelin, 1st and 3rd place going to Finland, and 2nd to USA and Buzz Gagne.

And now Buzz is in for a followup. In mid-July, he's heading to Baton Rouge, Louisana for the 1017 USA Track and Field Masters National Championships. He'll be throwing his javelin on Sunday, July 16, and then going on to New Orleans for a couple days before heading back to New Hampshire. Now retired, Buzz has been a javelin coach since 2008. He also lectures at schools and colleges in the New England area about Viet Nam, having been a veteran of the war there. Buzz will be at the birthday party and is looking forward to catching up with many old friends and classmates.

We Did It -- We Are Now 50+

Use the menu on the left, and select Photo Album. The bottom choice is what you're looking for - The 50th Reunion-2015. Therein lie photos and stories galore. Kick back and enjoy yourself!

What a weekend it was. Our anticipated crowd sizes were exceeded at every event. Classmates came from far and wide and partied together all weekend. It didn't take long to get back in the groove of feeling the old friendships reappear. There were more than 75 classmates at the GHS open house on Friday afternoon, and I'm pretty sure we broke 100 at Taylor's Tavern later in the evening. There was no way that when 9:00p.m. rolled around our class was going to clear out. Many classmates hung out into the wee hours. A second wave actually joined the class after 9, when the GHS football game ended (we lost).

There was golfing, kayaking, boat cruises on the Connecticut River (two boatloads), and of course the banquet Saturday night. Sunday morning had a few informal brunches taking place here and there at various restaurants throughout the county. And slowly, we headed back to our homelands -- some just a few blocks away, others across the country. A common theme heard toward the end of the weekend is that we should get together again sooner than the 55th. We'll see what the next reunion chair, Rob Pratt opts to do.

So many emotions, such friendship floated along all weekend. I think Steve Garanin said it best:

Friends,
Imagine, 50 years since we graduated.  More than a lifetime for some and a brief note in the continuing saga of life for others.
Not having attended a reunion since our 25th (except for the impromptu 60th Birthday Party), I approached this weekend with some trepidation. After all, there would likely be people attending whom I had not seen in the past 50 years. I was concerned that I would not remember high school friends; classmates, in some instances, of up to 12 years. Further, I readily acknowledge that I too have changed in many aspects, not the least of which is in physical appearance.
Alas, with but a few rare exceptions, everyone was familiar and all were very friendly.  In those few instances of hesitation the thoughtfully provided name tags removed the awkwardness of the moment. They allowed for a renewal of a close association and a rekindling of long-developed friendship.
What I found most interesting was the metamorphosis in appearance of everyone throughout the weekend. When first seeing a classmate on Friday or during the day Saturday there was a familiarity tempered by the patina of 50 years of the aging process. As the various functions progressed into the Saturday evening banquet, I observed small but definite changes in everyone. The patterns developed over many years of being in close association with classmates started to assert themselves. The comfortableness of shared memories lent a calming and relaxing aspect to the numerous interactions occurring throughout the room.
Beyond all that, there was a phenomenon that was taking place that totally took me by surprise. It was as if we were all transported back to the future (With apologies to McFly). The sight of all these familiar faces. Seeing Betty Nee and Jim Fotopoulis. The sound of conversation while continuing to eat our meals. The click of the buttons on the jukebox and the resultant music of a bygone era. What I noted was that everyone in the room was looking younger and younger as the evening continued. By eves end, we had all been transported back to our final days at GHS; older and wiser, but just as comfortable, as if it were 50 years earlier.
To all I was able to speak with, a shout-out and thanks for the catching – up time. To those I was never able to get to say Hi to, I look forward to correcting that error at our next reunion.
Be well until we meet again,

Steve Garanin

The Teamwork!

We truly had a village working in harmony for more than a year to bring together the events we shared together. A meeting in June 2014 at Terrazza restaurant started the ball rolling in earnest. Some 20 classmates gathered live, and electronically to begin planning. A second meeting in May 2015 really got the team in gear, and it was nonstop from that time until the reunion activities ended. So many helped in so many ways, big and small: Deb Bruce Johnson, Sue Mack McDonald, Sue Carey Duckworth, Steve Garanin, Ed Hall, Bob Giffen, Carla Graveline Bernier (a special shout out to Kringle Candle and the Kitredge team for providing the wood dance floor for Saturday night), Ken Burdick, Dave Wartel, Don Holmes Rick Richardson, TJ Strahan, John Taylor, Phyllis Stone, Marsha Drew Bittner, Jane Lapointe Kosterman, Bill Seretta, Beth Anderson Roy, Shirley Brightman Nelson, Trish Newton, Ellen Morrissey Kelton, Karen Steiner Helbig and of course, Rob Pratt.

There were about a dozen classmates whom I refer to as "underwriters". They stepped forward before the reunion began and gave us some solid fiscal support that ensured both reasonable prices for this 50th gala event (the Friday night party at Taylor's was free, as were the two boat rides down the Connecticut River, and the dinner expenses for the banquet were kept at an affordable level), also that when all was said and done, we walked away from the weekend with a positive balance of more than $2,300. This will ensure startup money for whatever (and whenever) next event we have. That is an amazingly healthy situation to be in for our class!

I'd have to say if there was one highlight to the weekend, it belongs to Danny Wright. The wonder and joys of technology enabled Dan to be with us on Saturday night at the banquet, leaving hardly a dry eye in the house! And the class reciprocated by sending Dan individual and collective messages back to him. A special shout to Bill Seretta for making these moment of magic happen for us all. You can see the two videos - Dan's note to us ( https://youtu.be/xjBfIZuRvkU) and our response back to Dan (https://youtu.be/KvehbbYIYE8 )

Reflections From Classmates

Here are stories writtten by classmates who are unable to be at the 50th Reunion.

On the evening of the reunion, Mary Boeh send along a message for the class, which follows here:  "Dear GHS classmates.  I wanted so much to see you at our reunion, but my health is not good. I have only fond memories of my time at GHS. We had the the best chance for education and we should be very proud of our teachers and all the people who worked at our school.  I wish everyone a happy reunion and I miss you all.   I hope to see you at our next reunion.  I send my love to everyone."

Old Photos

by Susan Hutchinson Webster

It was finally time to clean out the hall closet, and I ended up spending all weekend looking over old photos. Some very old photos. Would you believe 40-year-old photos?? Itís hard to believe I had brown hair, down to my shoulders! Since then, Iíve had blond hair, red hair, permed hair, frosted hair. Now, the real me has brown hair frosted with gray. So many colors, so little time. I have photos of the wedding. I have some of everyoneís first wedding. We all looked so innocent and trusting. Not a care in the world. Itís hard to believe we were ever that young. Most of the friends are working on their second or third marriage now. There are children, and half siblings and step siblings. And when did all these grandchildren show up?!!

Our parents are in some. They looked so happy. They looked so young! They didnít even have gray hair. They didnít even have wrinkles. We were at the beach, a family reunion, a wedding, a babyís christening. Our parents are gone now. All of them. Where did the time go?

There were shots of us graduating from college. Arms around each other. Diplomas in our hands. We were the generation of change Ė gonna make some big changes. Just you wait and see!! Some of us I think are still waiting. So much to do, so little time.

The brother and sister shots are great. All of us standing in a row on Easter Sunday in our best church clothes. The boys always looked bored to death. I remember my brother Don always ate the ears off of my chocolate Easter bunny. My brother, the one who is a great-grandfather now. Where did the time go?

My big sister. The one who took me to see Bambi and Old Yeller and My Fair Lady. The one who bought me milk shakes at the Corner Cupboard coffee shop before we headed home. My big sister. Shirley would be a great-grandmother now. She would be sewing clothes for their dolls. There was so much to do, so little time.

And us. Us in college. Us just married. Us in Europe. Us with our Mothers. Us with our children. Us with our brothers and sisters. Us with our nieces and nephews. Us with our great-nieces and great-nephews. Us with our friends. Us with our friends who are no longer friends. Us with hair on our heads and not in our noses. Us without glasses and without wrinkles. Us without a care in the world. What happened? Where did all that the time go?

So much timeÖ so little time. ©2009 Susan J. Webster

Remembering Our Graduation Day

So here we are, a full half century later. Can you remember that afternoon? Remember Jud Duncan's Dad providing the Invocation and Benediction? Remember the words of wisdom provided to us by a college admissions officer? Me neither. Graduation ceremonies are like that, even today. What WE are celebrating is our togetherness over the past half century. There aren't many high school classes that have the cohesion, the fun together, the memories together, that we share.

On that day there were 306 of us standing as the GHS Class of 1965 - that's 261 regular class and 45 vocational class members. Over the past five decades we have had 50 classmates pass away, so today we stand together as 256.

Come October 16-18, we will gather and live it up once again. It's going to be a memorable time - moreso than the graduation ceremony that has faded from our memories.

 

A Bit of Nostalgia from the Fall of 1963

ghslunch1963

This is a pretty special photo. It comes from the inside cover of the GHS Evergreen for the Class of 1964. The picture was taken in the Fall of 1963 by George Rosa who was doing most of the yearbook photography at that time. GHS itself was a mere six years old. Today this front entrance is gone, some of the students here have also passed on. The students are a mix of juniors and seniors. See who you recognize! For hints, go to the You Grew Up Around Greenfield Facebook page, where the photo is drawing a lot of attention.

The Time Capsule at GHS

On September 2nd, school started at GHS, and a time capsule from the 1957 building was opened. I would call the contents weak -- at least as reported in the Recorder. Perhaps if a new time capsule is created at the new school, some deeper thinking will be involved. I for one, was disappointed by the lack of substance found in the GHS 1957 time capsule.  Here's a quick summary of 1957 - none of which were mentioned in the capsule. Getting beyond the obvious of a couple of the most iconic American cars ever made – the ’57 Chevy and the ’57 Ford Thunderbird,  there were little things like the opening of West Side Story, Leave it to Beaver began on TV,  and Charles Van Doren won $129,000 on the TV game show 21. Then there was Jack Kerouac releasing On the Road, and of course Sputnik.  


Musically, rock and roll was picking up steam with some of the big hits of ‘57 including Jailhouse Rock and All Shook Up by Elvis Presley; School Day and Rock & Roll Music by Chuck Berry; Great Balls of Fire by Jerry Lee Lewis; Lucille by Little Richard, and Wake Up Little Susie by the Everly Brothers, among many classics. How did all that stuff get overlooked.

How About Some of Our Own GHS Senior Year Memories?

Let’s look a bit more at our own early GHS history.  In the Fall of 1964, when we were seniors, Dave Ciszewski set a one mile record at the Franklin County Fair that still stands today, 4:38.8; and Brian Bulman threw the javelin for 162’8”, another record that still stands.  On the global scene, all was far from quiet. Nelson Mandela was sentenced to life in prison; Khrushchev deposed; Martin Luther King  received the Nobel Peace Prize; and 3 civil rights workers were killed in Mississippi.  Postage was still 5 cents for first class; Northern Dancer won the Kentucky Derby (yeah, I know we were still completing our junior year then); the St. Louis Cardinals beat Yankees in the World Series, and the top song at the Academy Awards was Days of Wine and Roses by Henry Mancini. Big musical hits showed a major shift with the British Invasion (the Beatles and others) , but the Righteous Brothers held on to the Number One spot on Billboard's Top 100. Here's their list.

1

You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling

Righteous Brothers

2

My Girl

Temptations

3

You Really Got Me

Kinks

4

House Of The Rising Sun

Animals

5

Where Did Our Love Go

Supremes

6

I Get Around

Beach Boys

7

Dancing In The Street

Martha & the Vandellas

8

Oh, Pretty Woman

Roy Orbison

9

A Hard Day's Night

Beatles

10

She's Not There

Zombies

11

I Feel Fine

Beatles

12

The Times They Are A'Changin'

Bob Dylan

13

All Day And All Of The Night

Kinks

14

Under The Boardwalk

Drifters

15

A Change Is Gonna Come

Sam Cooke

16

Gloria

Them

http://digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/bg_hits/bg_hits_64.html [This is a link to the full list of hits - other years are there too.]


We should be keeping the next 13 months near and dear to our hearts, as we rejoice recalling each of the months of our Senior Year in high school, beginning with the summer of ’64, until we grabbed up our diplomas in June in 1965. Our yearbooks, and certainly our 50th reunion will help us reflect on all the within-GHS events: all the sporting events; band activities; the prom; the Senior Play – The Mouse That Roared; the BIGGEST Christmas tree to ever grace the foyer of GHS from an anonymous donor; field trips (walking to Leyden Glen with the German class), and on and on. So many great memories.  Send in some of your favorites to share with classmates, bringing back the good old days.

More Changes Than Just GHS

We once knew a place at the west end of Main Street called Sweeney Ford. It's now Ford-Toyota and has been in the process of building a whole new facility on the site of the old building. You might recall the bas relief images of transportation modes that graced the upper parts of the original building, making it historically significant. Those parts are being saved and should find a new home on the soon-to-come municipal parking garage for the Transportation Center off Olive Street [No photos yet]. This may all take place by Christmastime 2014.

A Spring visit to the hometown by Jeff Burgess for his Mom's 92nd birthday gave him a chance to show his granddaughter good old Four Corners Elementary School. There's a whole new wing and the front parking lot has a grassy island within it.

Bench Visitors Continue

bench

Gerry May visiting in the Summer of 2014.

al and bill

Alan Jenest and Bill Phelps recently stopped by to pose at "our" bench.

Resident Georgian Dr.Rosemary Fleming Kaszans enjoyed a New England visit in mid-July that included an all too-brief visit to the homeland. She's here with fellow classmate and local resident Linda Beaudoin. This makes no change in the balance of locals-versus-visitors to the bench. Plenty more locals still to make an official appearance! In the next edition I hope to not only have more classmate bench photos, but I'll also reorganize this section so all the bench shots are together. In latter June, 2013, a cluster of classmates dislocated a bench resident for a shot. Their story is classic. Another shot has Floridian Jeff Neal having no trouble with the warm air just a couple days later.

rose and linda

Rosemary Fleming Kaszans and Linda Beaudoin

4 ladies

Here are Marsha Drew Bittner, Ellen Morrissey Kelton, Karen Steiner Helbig and Trish Newton posing for their annual appearance at the bench. The story of this picture is far better than any others to date. Being a public bench, anyone is entitled to enjoy a moment or two of repose. Seems like there was a 'gentleman' occupying the bench when this fearless foursome arrived for a photo-op. But he was not particularly inclined to relocate himself once all the requisite primping for the picture had taken place... so short of using brute force (and not much short of it), the guy was persuaded to pick another location. Not being a happy camper, he also had no inclination to use the lady's camera and take the photo. So, a second phase of cajoling took place with passerbys until a jogger was finally threatened with bodily harm by this now irate group of senior citizen dames. He saw the light, took the photo and quickly got on his way. We thank all the cast of characters required to bring this picture of our classmates to us!

Jeff Neal

Aside from some technical difficulties in formatting, this photo of classmate Jeff Neal is intentionally left large. You might recall that Jeff was voted Best Looking in the class, so here's an opportunity to see that Mother Nature has indeed been good to Jeff over the decades!

If you scroll down the page, you'll come to many more pictures of class members gathering at our bench. Summer is a great time to consider stopping by and getting a photo made to share with the class! More-or-less, there are now about 16 of us having graced the bench with a visit (and a photo).

TheWay We Were Part Two(January 2013)

     And now we enter 2013. Fifty years ago it was a point where we were midway through our first year in high school – getting used to the concept of being a GHS student, and beginning to look forward to graduation in 1965.
     So many things going on in 1963! Most of us turned 16 and got the magical document, a driver’s license. For our generation, the front end of the baby-boomers, this was a license to adulthood, to freedom! No longer strapped with walking, bicycle trips downtown, or worse, riding with our parents, we had gained the mobility to be on our own… at least it felt that way. Off to A &W, for a Mama, Papa or Baby-burger and of course a root beer float and french fries.  Or further, past the town line over into Montague City and the magical world of pizza at Robestelli’s on the lake. 
     With raging hormones also coming into play, other destinations suddenly were additional alternatives as 1963 moved onward. There were dances in the GHS cafeteria, school basketball games, many club events, and of course as summer approached we had the spectacular treat of 3 drive-in theaters in the community: The Deerfield Drive-in on Route 5, Northfield Drive-in on Route 2 and Pioneer Drive-in out in Montague City, or maybe that was Turners Falls. What choices.
     And the rides we had. Fortunately for us, 1957 and thereabouts had been a landmark period for the American automotive industry, producing classics like the 1957 Chevrolet, the Thunderbird, Plymouth and Dodge products with push-button transmissions! These cars were just the right age for us to start digging into the world of affordable used cars in the early 1960s. There were some European models that quietly slid into Greenfield as well. Barry Winans was known for his Morris Minor sedan, among other exotics; John Taylor had a Triumph TR3 (still does). And then of course, it was also prime time for the vehicle that perhaps all of us owned at one time or another, or at least enjoyed plenty of seat-time - the Volkswagen – the bug, the microbus and the Karma-Ghia. We rode those beautiful little machines for well over a decade.
     Rock and roll was also about a decade old in 1963. Dreams by older generations that the ‘noise’ would dry up and blow away were proven unfounded. It was a year of international music explosion too. The first LP in the United States by the Beatles, “Meet the Beatles” came onto the scene in early 1963, and the rest, is of course history.  By no means was it all hard rock or British invasion – Dave Clark 5, Rolling Stones, and many others not withstanding. We continued to enjoy and embrace ‘good’ music, like Aker Bilk’s “Stranger on the Shore”, a warm clarinet solo. Roy Orbison’s “In Dreams” had come out over the holiday season and stayed with us well through springtime.  To this day, The Surfaris “Wipeout” remains an all time classic, but probably not quite as infamous as the Kingsmen’s monster hit for the Spring of 1963…. who doesn’t  remember Louie, Louie? See, I told you there was great music back then.  Even the concept of “oldies” got underway perhaps in 1963, as we reached back to early rock just to demonstrate to our elders that ‘our’ music had staying power. … Rock Around the Clock, Love Is Strange, Speedo, Oh Donna, Little Darlin’, Sea Cruise, Sleep Walk --  so many gems from the 1950s. (You can hear these pieces ringing in your ears now, right?)
     In addition to driver’s licenses, 16 brought the chance for many of us to get a job, not just a summer event with tobacco, or cucumbers, but something in town where we related to the community.  Don’t forget though, this was a time before fast-foods, so we didn’t flock to positions in McDonalds and the like.  It was Friendly’s, Adam’s Donut Shop, Minute Man Diner, Turnbull’s, Howard Johnsons, gas stations, Wilson’s and many other local establishments who hired us on part time in our first ‘professional’ roles.  The Times and we were changing indeed!


The Way We Were (September 2012)

     Once upon a time, way back in September 1962, a half century ago, the Class of 1965 began coalescing as a class. We’d come out of Greenfield Junior High School and were headed toward the world of adulthood. Our final year in Junior High was somewhat of a transition.  Our class grew substantially in size as students completed Holy Trinity in 8th grade and then mostly transferred into GJHS for 9th grade. 

     In addition, some of our classmates left us to attend Mount Herman, Deerfield Academy or Northfield School for Girls.  So there had been a bit of jumbling around, but things were settling down as we moved into what was then the town’s five year old “new” high school building, having opened in 1957.

     What a time in our lives! We were old enough to navigate the entire town of Greenfield, pretty much on foot or bicycle – from journeys to Mohawk Music (TJ Strahan’s dad’s jukebox shop) way down by Cheapside bridge at the edge of Deerfield, to Four Corners School north of town, to Newton School’s baseball field on the west side of town, and even out to the pumping station bridge way up in the northwest edge of ‘the meadows’.

     High school was different. We began the serious bureaucratic counting of course credits, working toward some number like 18 or 19 credits so that we could graduate.  And we had vast choices of the classes we could, or had to, take. GHS had four foreign languages for us – German, French, Latin and Spanish… a whole new world was opening before our eyes. And the sciences,  wow – Biology got real fancy, and there was Chemistry and Physics too. Business courses leapt out as many choices well beyond just the Typing class we had been exposed to in Junior High. Some of our classmates branched out to the GHS vocational program to become specialized tradesmen in auto mechanics, printing, construction machine shop and other fields. And then there were the organizations and clubs – nearly two dozen to choose from. What a great resource the school provided to us.

     Walks through Shattuck Park, listening to autumn leaves crunch beneath our feet as we headed to Adam’s Donut Shop were fond memories for many.  Apples were in full harvest, and cider flowed plentifully. Fall had arrived!

     For years we had followed GHS football and attended the annual Turners Falls/GHS rivalry at Vet’s Field, but now, some of the guys in our class were actually part of that Fall 1962 GHS Football team, and some of the women were part of cheerleading and the color guard.  And some of us were marching as part of the GHS Band in the Fair Parade, the Veteran’s Day Parade, and performing at football games as well. We had really become part of GHS! And we looked forward to the Homecoming Bonfire, and Sadie Hawkins dance.

     It was an amazing time in the world too. Not many of us probably lamented over Marilyn Monroe’s death in August, just before we entered high school. John Kennedy had been President for less than 2 years when we started high school, and he had enormous challenges to face.  The long-brewing conflict that had been quietly evolving on the other side of the world was beginning to become known as the Viet Nam War. When JFK came into office there were a mere 900 “advisors” from the US military in South Viet Nam whom President Eisenhower had dispatched. That quickly escalated to more than 16,000 by 1964 and no longer was the Southeast Asian conflict a distant conversation piece. It was in our face with older siblings and friends headed off to war!

War almost came close to home in the Fall of our sophomore year as well.  The Cuban missile crisis grabbed our undivided attention non-stop for a week, October 22-28 back in 1962. We were fortunate that the situation defused and no war came to the US. Remember being glued to the old black and white TVs, watching and waiting?

     Another national event that we perhaps paid less attention to in the Autumn of 1962 (hey, we were only mid-teens and Bob Dylan’s very first album had only been out for a year – and the Beatles were just releasing “Love Me Do”) was integration of the US school system. President Kennedy had barred religious and racial discrimination from all Federal housing on November 20, 1962 – little did we know that a year and two days later, he would be assassinated. Additionally, public school desegregation suits began on September 17th, leading to James Meredith being admitted to the University of Mississippi at the end of September. Two people were killed over that event and racial violence became a daily news event described to us by Walter Cronkite or Chet Huntley and David Brinkley.  If we were lucky enough to watch late night TV, we might have caught Johnny Carson as he began the first year of Tonight Show.

     Although it was a tumultuous time, lots of positive, exciting things were taking place as well. NASA had been formed in 1958, and as we entered high school, we became familiar with the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo space programs. Also, the Peace Corps celebrated its very first anniversary on September 22, 1962.

     Cars were king in our culture. Volkswagen had recently dominated the ‘practical’ car scene and Detroit was fighting back. The Chevy Corvair first appeared sparsely in 1960, but by 1962 they were plentiful, and available for less than $2,000 – new.  It was heralded as the first American economy car. Ford, not to be outdone, went a slight different and more sporty route with the Mustang.  Designs began in 1962, and the first cars went on sale before we were out of high school, called the 1964½ Mustang. You could pick one up for $2,368. Just the stuff we needed to motor on over to A&W Root Beer . The average gas price was under 30 cents a gallon, and an average new house price was $12,500 in 1962.

     When we went to the movies, and if we actually watched the film, we may have seen El Cid, West Side Story, To Kill a Mockingbird, Spartacus, or Lawrence of Arabia.

     So, as we approach our 50th Class Reunion in 2015, it’s also fun to reflect back on those three years we spent at GHS, becoming who we are -- the Class of 1965. Send some of your memories of the good old days of high school and I'll keep putting together more tales from a half century ago.

THE BENCH - And The Fans Continue To Grow

beth
Beth Anderson Roy in late July 2012

Laura

Laura Jenkins Leonard in late June 2012

More classmates have been to "The Bench", and more keep coming. There are now a half dozen benches surrounding the commons, with 'our' bench facing forward to Main Street. An additional bench also exists on the curve near the swimming pool, honoring an accident victim.



group
July 9th found Phil Grisé, Helen Boguslawski Chappell, Shirley Brightman Nelson, Pat Chornyak Grisé, and John Taylor sizing up the bench. You have no idea how hard it was for us oldies to haul our legs back off the bench following this photo session!


Almost a year has passed since Greenfield Mayor William Martin asked the community to help support a new model - one in which Main Street  benches would once again grace the business section of downtown.  Our class jumped on the idea, and donated sufficient funds to purchase one of the new benches. Some 21 class members contributed (see the table further down this page of the Donor Listing).
     We had a dream that the bench might appear for the Franklin County Fair parade last September.  Then we had a wish that we might find the bench installed in time for our Class Reunion last October. No to both of those noble thoughts.  Apparently, discussion renewed among downtown merchants regarding the benches being 'magnets' for riff-raff and other undesireables that might scare away customers -  who already have become a rare breed on Main and Federal. So plans had to be reworked as to the location of up to six benches downtown. The bench iteself is constructed out of recycled materials that will ensure it's durability and beauty. Our bench is handsomely engraved with reference to our class as the donor, for everyone driving along Main Street to see.
The great unveiling took place on Monday June 18th at 9 o'clock on the Town Common at Main/Federal/Bank Row/Court Square.  And, as the pictures show, our class arrived in volume and style for the occasion. After the ceremony, some classmates continued the celebration at People's Pint and at The Country Creamee in Turners Falls (not necessarily in that order). Concurrently, the group was celebrating not only the bench but also T.J. Strahan's 65th birthday, and Rich Shortell's one month post-hip replacement surgery. So it was a grand day all around.


group
Classmates left to right: Karen Steiner Helbig, Phyllis Stone, Susan Mack McDonald, TJ Strahan, Trish Newton, Linda Wolanski, Rich Shortell, Marsha Drew Bittner, Ellen Morrissey Kelton, Bill McDonald, Bob Martin, Mayor William Martin, and Bill Conant.

bench5
Bill Conant, Trish Newton, Marsha Drew Bittner, Birthday Boy Strahan, and Ellen Morrissey Kelton.

formal
Bill McDonald, Karen Steiner Helbig, Mayor Martin, T.J. Strahan, Ellen Morrissey Kelton, Rich Shortell, Sue Mack McDonald, Trish Newton, Marsha Drew Bittner, Bill Conant, Linda Wolanski, and Dr. Bob Martin, all the way from Alaska.

rich arrives
Rich Shortell arrives at the ceremony, flanked by Marsha Drew Bittner and Trish Newton

another group
Looking eastward (toward the Garden Theater) here's the gang along Bank Row. Sue Mack McDonald, Bill McDonald, Marsha Drew Bittner, Bill Conant, Ellen Morrissey Kelton, T.J. Strahan, Trish Newton, Karen Steiner Helbig and Rich Shortell.

bench planners
T.J. and Ellen discuss the bench with Department of Public Works staffers

sippers
Having a sip of something fine is Bill Conant and Ellen Morrissey Kelton

tj
And, it is after all, T.J.'s birthday. Here he's getting a well-deserved pat from Rich Shortell, with Marsha Drew Bittner in the background.

A Couple Good Old Sports
    

A recent baseball memorial event took place at Vet's Field. On June 8, 2012 a program, partially arranged by Bill Phelps honored Tom Suchanek, GHS Class of 1964. "Shu" was honored with a pick-up game of some 50 former GHS athletes from as far back as 1949. The occasion was marking the 40+ years of service Tom has given to GHS and the community, including being baseball coach for the Green Wave for more than four decades.  Bill, a long-time and well-recognized athlete in his own right, is often recognized in Greenfield today as the announcer for sporting events at Vet's Field (note the microphone in his left hand). Now, if we could just get Shu to smile!

bill phelps and tom suchanek

Tom Suchanek '64, Bill Phelps '65  - Greenfield Recorder Photo

 

How Are We Doing, Actuarily

     As more and more of our class retires, which sometimes causes reflection on where we've been, and where we're heading, the topic of longevity comes up.  I know that I've been asked on several occasions to consider our classes' overall well-being. I guess that's because I tend to read the Greenfield Recorder's obituary page every day, and from time-to-time have the task of writing a memorial for one of our classmates who has passed on. 
    One of the more common questions I hear is: "Geez, that listing at the bottom of our website indicates that 41 of our classmates have died. That seems like a lot, is it?"  Well, I may be a researcher, but not of the actuarial type. So I don't have a direct answer. But being a researcher, I don know where to turn for technical support. Susan Carey Duckworth's husband Wayne, is in fact an actuarian. So I asked him.  But first here's a bit more background on our departed classmates. There were 25 guys who have died and 16 women. Give or take a few, we use the total class size as 312, who graduated back in 1965. You can see the full listing of the names in a light blue box at the bottom of this page.
    Wayne provided the following information from a statistical perspective:  The US Census tables for population , which were constructed in 1991, indicated the probability of a 17 year old living to age 65 was about 77.41% for males (for females its 87.36%) So, if our class was equally males and females (it isn't) we would expect 55 classmates to have passed away.  What that all means in the end is that we are doing pretty darn well.  Or, that 14 of us are on borrowed time!  None of this accounts for the 19 classmates who are 'among the missing'. They alone could easily bump us up over the national average!  From another perspective, at our current general age of 65, the women in the class can count on 20+ more years and the men, slightly less than that.


   

Still More Views of

Good Old Greenfield

    

     Thanks to Richard Shortell here are a couple of shots displaying the new Springtime 2010 look of Greenfield's Town Commons. Both the Farmer's Market and the new Bank Row shops can be seen -- with still more development to come.

bank row

 

bank row shops

     Some pretty dynamic local news, especially for those of us no longer in the Franklin County area.  Irmarie Jones reported in the Recorder today (yes, she is still there) that the Greenfield Minor League is playing at Lunt Field, with the first games of the season on Sunday, marking the 50th Anniversary of the use of Lunt Field. Downtown photos by Rich Shortell.

    Bill Phelps, who was 13 that summer, was too old to play in the minor league, but, George Maniatty and Ed Sanborn could play because they wouldn't turn 13 until fall. Both of them tied with the most home runs for the season, with 13 home runs each, Phelps said.

     ''Before Lunt's, the games were played behind Holy Trinity School, Hillside Park, Newton School and Vets Field,'' Phelps told me. He said the Minor League was founded in 1954.

     And then there's news about downtown. There are now three new shops open on Bank Rowin the old bank that has sat vacant for more than 30 years, AND, there is a plan underway to connect them with the Garden Theater.  The Garden will be completely overhauled and turned into a 1,000 seat performing arts center in conjunction with GCC.  About 80% of the costs will be borne by state and federal tax credits! Once upon a time (see photo) the Garden seated 1,877. It opened in 1929 and was raped and pillaged in 1986 into mini-theaters. See gardenartscomplex.org for more information.

garden






Another Web Application for GHS '65ers

     A new chapter in alumni communication has begun. Our class now has its own Facebook site. While we're lucky enough to have this website for our class musings, the existence of something more like a bulletin board seemed like a reasonable alternative. With more than 175 million people and groups now on Facebook, we too can have a spot to link directly with each other, sharing ideas, pictures, videos, recipes, whatever!! The whole concept of "social networking" isn't just for kids after all. As more and more of us move into retirement, the added leisure time gives us an opportunity to reconnect with old friends. Facebook is an excellent vehicle for doing just that. Free too.  The only requirement is that you must establish a Facebook page for yourself. You can do that at www.facebook.com.  Then, using the SEARCH tool in the upper right of your own Facebook homepage, enter "GHS65" and that will bring you right to our new page.

 


GHS All-Years Alumni Organization

     This group was founded by GHS grads in 2001, and includes alumni from many different classes. They have established a Wall of Honor, physically located along the corridors of GHS. The fundamental criterion for eligibility is having graduated at least 10 years ago -- see, I told you our class members are shoe-ins.  There is a two-page form to complete [use these pdf files] Wall of Fame Page One and Wall of Fame Page Two. Or, you can contact Betty Nee ant the GHS Office, yes the very same Betty Nee, at 413-772-1350, etc. 111. The completed for should be mailed to Patrick Garland, GHS English Teacher, P.O. Box 1332, Greenfield, MA 01302-1332..
     What do they want to know about you? All the usual stuff, regarding what you've done since high school; employment; family; helpful aspects of GHS; favorite class and teacher; cherished memories; advice for current students; a favorite quotation, and of course a photo.  The Journalism class will whip your raw materials into a work of art.
     From my perspective, and you know I know a fair amount about all of our class, we are absolutely loaded with great candidates for the Wall of Fame. So come on, let's demonstrate that the Class of 1965 is way out there.  We could have a wall of fame for firefighters alone!

 

GHS Teacher Writes Autobiography

     Way back in the early to mid-1960's Almut Metzroth began a new career. She was a fill-in substitute teacher for a year in GHS's modern languages department.  As a native German, she was a natural to teach the subject to us. Not having the appropriate college degrees and credentials, she was very ambivalent about her ability to teach.  Other than my personal experiences of two years in German I , followed by two years in German II, she trained students magnificently. In subsequent years, she completed her bachelor's degree and stayed on until 1989 as a teacher. This summer, she released Thorns and Roses, a recollection of her escape from Nazi Germany as a teenager, then escaping the occupying Soviet Army and ultimately arriving in Greenfield.  The book also chronicles her years as a GHS teacher. Frau Metzroth has retired to Stuart, Florida and spends summers in Connecticut. You can find it on Amazon.


     And don't forget our very own Nostalgia Page!!
http://moreoldfortyfives.com/TakeMeBackToTheSixties.htm


A new addition to the retro-reflections:  http://objflicks.com/TakeMeBackToTheSixties.htm



  • The NOSTALGIA PAGE contains many bits and pieces of the old times, and could use some new additions -- send them in!!
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  •  The OLD FOLKS AT HOME STORIES provides glimpses into where several of our classmates have settled down across the country and what's going on in their lives today.

News to Share for the Birthday Party/Reunion or on the Website

If you have any news of interest to the class, personal website links, etc., SEND MAIL to your humble webmaster, Phil Grisé for posting on our website.


            Links to:

Class of 1964 Website

This site includes photos from their GHS '64 50th Reunion.


GHS All-Years Alumni Organization



The list below shows us who served in the military back in the 60's and 70's.  Those classmates who served on active duty in Vietnam are so designated by a "v" preceeding their name. We apologize in advance for anyone omitted from this list,or incorrectly added. Send in any changes and we'll make adjustments tothe list. Please notify Bill Phelps of the changes or additions.

 

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Remembering Veterans from the GHS Class of 1965
v-Michael Babits Patrick Hogan v-Jeffrey Neal

v-Timothy Bates

Tom Bean

v-James Johnston

v-Neil Kabaniec

Michael O'Bryan
v-Carl Becklo John Kaczenski
v-Edward Palin
v-Joseph Bergeron v-John Killeen
v-William Phelps

 v-Raymond Billiel

v-Gerald Knower
v-Ronald Phillips
Kenneth Burdick Edward Kurkoski
v-Robert Poirier
v-Jeff Burgess Brian Lacoy
v-Gary Remick
v-Christopher Carson v-Edward Lacroix
Robert Rineer
v-Francis Chabot v-Robert Lahey
v-Richard Shortell

Leslie Robert Clift II

Calvin Lang
Frank Smith
Walter Conant v-Robert Luippold
Frederick Steiner
William Conant Dennis Lynch
T.J. Strahan
v-Frederic Conley James MacKenzie
Maurice Taylor
v-Richard Dame v-George Maniatty
Bernard Tobey

Alan Darling

Barry Dow

William Fisher

v - Earl Matthews

Bruce MacLeod

David Wartel
Robert Foote W. Gerald McCabe v-Michael Werth
v-Herbert Forgey v-John McDonough Barry Winans
v-Keith Franklin Gerald May
Alan Wondoloski
v-Leon Gagne William McDonald
v-Russell Woods

Col. Stephen Garanin

Robert Giffen

Robert Grant

Ronald Hawkes

Raymond Miller Daniel Wright
Greg Isles

v-A. George Milton

William  "Rick" Wright
v-Maj. Alan Jenest MD
v-David Morey
v-Francis Yestramski

 

Classmate Passings

The following members of the Class of 1965 have deceased .

  Only ONE of our clasmates was killed in military combat

Linda Allen

Mary Audette

Francis Babineau

Francis Barber

Thomas Bean III

James Bernier

 
William Bourbeau

Alfred Bresciano 

Gayle "Pat" Bristol

Susan Broughan

Bill Buck

Carol Burnham

Ruth Cinquantini

Walter Conant

Fred Conley II

Kathleen Crofton

Lynn Dame

Richard Dame

Robert Elliot

Susan Fahey

Lawrence Fay

Robert (Pete) Feeney

Bill Fisher

Paulette "Cookie" Goly

Pamela Grant 

Robert Grant 

Henry Juhola

John Kidder

Kathryn Killay

Randi Kinner

Philip Knowlton

Robert Kulis

Robert Lahey

Sandra Leblanc

David Maleski

Earl Matthews - Died in Viet Nam

Robert Martin

Thomas Mayberry

John McDonough

Michael Molitoris

Robert Moore

David Morey

Cheryl Musyznski

Carole "Cookie" Peloskey

Joan Ann Phelps
Linda Pryzby

Gary Remick

Sandra Roscoe

David Sanford

Francis Sirum

Carol Stange

Loretta Stone

James Sund

Pat Twarog

Patty Underwood

Maryellen Urkiel

Gary Walsh

Richard Weston

Chris Williams

Paul Williams

Barry Winans

Richard Winn

Daniel Wright

Carolyn Yeager

Jonathan Zack

Edward Zentgraf

 


 

.*****Know Where These Final Few*****
 Missing Classmates Are?

The following persons have vanished from our "official" database. If you know the whereabouts of anyone listed below, maybe you're a relative or you even have a pretty good clue, pass this info on to Deb Bruce or Phil Grise so these folks can be contacted and enjoy the class website.

 

ELIZABETH ANDERSON 

 

(no - not Beth Anderson)

ROBERTA MOORE BROWNING

AL SMITH

JEAN O'KULECZ

LINDA JEAN HALE

RICKI ROOD


CORINNE JUREK
ROBERT KREJMAS GREENE
ROSEMARY LEMIEUX BUCK
BONNIE STINSON CRAIG
EUGENE LABOR

THOMAS ROUSELL


DELBERT INGRAM
RUSSELL O'LARI

 

The GHS School Song has arrived. Click here to listen!! 

 

GREENFIELD AND THE INTERNET

Visit the numerous homepages that now exist for  Greenfield .

Then, to have a fun time reading local news and old-time New England information, there's that very fine bulletin: The Greenfield Recorder is also online now. Take a look! 


Have you ever waxed nostalgic and maybe wondered about the "Greater Greenfield" area - Franklin County?  I have.  I can't recall learning a lot about out neighboring towns.  I do recall learning all the counties in Massachusetts along with all the states in the nation- but never the towns in our county.  On the wall at Clarkdale Apple Orchard they have a great old map of all the towns.

But now, technology has come to our rescue as well. I cannot tell you why, because I don't know,  but Microsoft has acquired aerial photographs of nearly all of Greenfield. The Internet battle for dominance of mapping programs includes out home town!  Go to http://local.live.com/  and type in an address, or even just Greenfield's zip code. While you'll at first see the usual-looking mapping program, choose AERIAL from the upper left navigation tool, and zoom in to get a better view. Then choose BIRD'S EYE and get ready to be astounded. Notice that you can also shift to views from the north or the south.  There are great shots of Poet's Seat Tower,  Main St., and maybe even the house you grew up in.  Try it, and don't forget to READ THE DIRECTIONS shown under WELCOME as this is a new beta-test site that changes pretty regularly.